book review falling into you jasinda wilder

Book Review: Falling Into You by Jasinda Wilder

Series: Book 1 in the ‘Falling’.

“I wasn’t always in love with Colton Calloway; I was in love with his younger brother, Kyle, first.” ~~ Jasinda Wilder (Book: Falling Into You)

That is a good line attention grabbing first line to hook the readers. So I downloaded the book.

Of course, I had ulterior motives to continue researching this new genre I have found not too long ago.

Genre: New Adult Romance.

Main Characters: Nell Hawthorne, Colton Calloway, Kyle Calloway. Jim & Rachel Hawthorne

‘Falling Into You by Jasinda Wilder’ ~~ Synopsis:

Nell and Kyle were childhood friends and without much trouble turned into sweethearts. Life for them was as good and smooth as it’d be, until, the day comes when they had to choose a college.

Nell wanted to go to some other college than the one Kyle was going to. Nell knew, their parents probably could have pulled some strings, if she agreed to join the one Kyle chose.

But for some reason she’s set on her choice. While taking their first vacation together, Kyle proposes to Nell.

Nell didn’t want to get engaged at such a young age of eighteen. Nell’s rejection resulted in them having a clash over the issue.

In a tragic twist of events, Kyle dies saving Nell, in front of her eyes.

Nell started to blame herself for Kyle’s death…if only she’d said yes. Nell met Colton at Kyle’s funeral and felt an instant attraction towards each other. Nell felt worse feeling anything for Kyle’s brother.

After Two Years:

Nell and Colton meet again. They are both living on their own, Nell only recently and Colton since he left home at seventeen due to his problems with his parents.

Since leaving his privileged life behind Colton has lived a rough and dangerous life. But he’s moving away from that dark path he took years ago to survive on his own in the new city.

He can see Nell is still holding on to the grief and blame and struggling to move on with her life.

Colton knows he can’t ‘fix’ her hurting heart, but he still wants to help. He wants to stay away from her. Mostly because he’s attracted to her and he’s almost made peace with his own past hurts & doesn’t want drama.

But Colton decides to take a chance and they both begin to fall for each other and try to make sense of all the dark emotions they are dealing with.

Colton opens up about his life and struggles to build a new life for himself. Nell too begins to talk about her guilt, feelings and emotions too, learning in the process that it’s okay to move on with her life. 

Review:

The Plus Points:

The plot is interesting and has potential.

But!

The Minus Points:

All the emotional engagement & intensity lasts for the first five chapters. After that there are glimpses of same emotional intensity here and there in the story, but missing at large.

For the first few chapters (five chapters exactly) I got to read exactly what the author promised in the beginning: a story about losing a beloved and learning to love again and live with it afterwards.

What had started as an interesting, highly emotional story, begins to lose its charm from chapter six onwards.

The good idea with potential begins to turn annoying. It gets interesting only when either Colton or Nell opens up about their past hurts.

You start wondering where’s the story about getting over grief and hurt when pages after pages are sex scenes.

Seems like filler scenes to move the non-existent story after a point. Take those scenes out and there’s a story good enough for a novella and not a novel.

Now this one matter I wasn’t going to discuss; I wanted to overlook it. As I’m not against sex scenes in the novels nor I’m 100% in favor of adding them as if there’s nothing else to add (maybe sometimes there isn’t, but there’s a separate genre for that!).  

It’s not as if I have not read books that are told in the similar format, for example: ‘Oxford Blues trilogy by Pippa Croft’ or ‘The Seduced Saga by Alex Lux’.

They didn’t annoy me much. The reason is simple: these authors are not claiming that their stories are anything other than what they really are.

But the more I read ‘Falling into You’ the more I got disenchanted with Ms. Wilder’s claim: ‘this-story-is-for-anyone-who’d-ever-lost-someone-they-loved-and-is-still-hurting’.

It isn’t. After finishing the words seemed manipulating to me than anything else, like suggesting something to someone before they start something to influence the outcome.

Lesson Learned From the Story:

Never pick a plot-theme you couldn’t deliver on. Even if you have picked such a theme and strayed far away into the wilderness….keep it to yourself & don’t tell the readers. They might feel cheated.

I sympathized with Nell’s character and even understood the guilt and blame, she’s taking on, to some extent. 

Colton, I’m not sure about, doesn’t seem like an original enough character to like.

The way this Colton character adds tiny details from his past only after a while, made me wonder, if the author made it all up as she went along the story.

Something happened to Nell and all of a sudden Colton: BTW, it happened in my life as well.

The story’s narrated from Nell and Colton’s POV. I only liked the story when it’s told from Nell’s POV; probably should have been told from her POV only.

Also, I don’t think either character learned to move on.

“Compassion and pity are not the same: Pity us looking down on someone, feeling sorry for them and offering nothing; compassion is seeing their pain and offering them understanding.” ~~ Jasinda Wilder (Book: Falling Into You)

Hit or Miss: OK.

Ratings: 2stars/5.

Buy:  Amazon   |   iTunes 

Happy Reading! & Don’t Forget To Subscribe If You Enjoyed Reading The Review.

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Priyanka Sharma

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